tempera paint

Yarn painting


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Tuesday afternoon art class explored painting with yarn recently.

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After soaking their yarn in tempera paint, students slowly pulled the yarn across their paper to create patterns of color.

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Everyone had fun exploring this new method of painting.

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The painting process took some time to learn how to master the yarn and control the paint.

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Everyone was very happy with their paintings and learning how to paint in a new way!

Leaves


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For our final Wednesday Afternoon Art class students explored printmaking.

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Students learned to create mono prints using rubber molds of leaves.

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Everyone used various colors of tempera paint on the molds.

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The students enjoyed learning the process and creating layers of leaves.

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The creative process engaged all of the participants in the class.

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When our classes resume in 2016 we will be moving to Tuesday Afternoon Art classes.  Hopefully you can join in the fun!

Pointillistic pumpkins


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Wednesday afternoon art students explored pointillism and pumpkins this autumn.

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Students employed tempera paint and cotton swabs to create their art.

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Using warm colors and pumpkin colors in a pattern of dots, students worked to create a unique dot-based pumpkin.

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Pointillism is a technique of painting in which small, distinct dots of color are applied in patterns to form an image. Georges Seurat and Paul Signac developed the technique in 1886, branching from Impressionism.

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The term “Pointillism” was first coined by art critics in the late 1880s to ridicule the works of these artists, and is now used without its earlier mocking connotation. 

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After completing their painted pumpkins, students cut out their images and applied them to a solid color background.

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Here are some examples of the students work.

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Maybe you can join us for our winter classes beginning in January.

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Autumn landscape


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Wednesday afternoon art classes created a mixed media landscape recently.

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After using watercolor paint for a background, students employed ink for trees and a landscape.

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This required concentration and learning to control the brush.

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The final step was to add bright leaf color with sponges.

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Everyone enjoyed this project and the opportunity to use many types of media.

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The final results were very nice as well!  Maybe you can join us for Wednesday afternoon art classes this winter?

Family Art Day


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Butterflies returned to the Art Junction today.

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Families came to the Art Junction on Saturday, March 23, 2013 to participate in creating clay butterflies and to help celebrate the return of spring.

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Our weather was still very winter-like, but our thoughts turned to spring and the renewal that will return to north-central Ohio soon.

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Families worked together to create butterflies from air-dry clay.

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Everyone had the opportunity to add paint to their creation as well.

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Crayola® Air-Dry Clay is a natural earth clay which air-dries to a hard solid. It can be used it to make clay sculptures, decorative items or plaques. No baking or firing needed. Easy clean-up. Minimal shrinkage.

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You can use most traditional clay sculpting techniques with Air-Dry Clay, such as coil, slab, pinch, score-and-weld.

DSCN7616 You can also press beads, small stones or other decorative items directly into the clay.DSCN7615

A butterfly is a mainly day-flying insect which includes moths.

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Butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight.  Some, like the Monarch, will migrate over long distances. A few butterflies eat harmful insects. Culturally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts.

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Everyone enjoyed the creative process of making a butterfly today.

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Maybe you can join us for a class, workshop, gallery opening or our next family art day.

 

Paint Day


 

November 17, 2012 was our Fun with Paint Workshop where participants explored many different ways to work with paint.

Participants explored splatter painting, painting with their finger and using paint scrapers during the painting process.

It was a fun day to let loose and jump into the creative process of painting with tempera paints.

Workshop participants created many wonderful painted expressions which were given front porch drying time.

Splatter painting and being expressive with a brush is a very freeing experience.

There was even a new method experimented with…dual painting with two brushes at a time.

Everyone had fun in this exploratory workshop.  Maybe you can join us for our next workshop?!  Paintings have a life of their own that derives from the painter’s soul.”-Vincent van Gogh

The final day of Art Camp


The last day of Art Camp involved the many-step process of creating tie-dye t-shirts.

After soaking their shirts in soda ash solution campers next decided upon the design they wished to tie their shirts into before adding dye.

There were many designs to choose from in which to tie  shirts in preparation for the dying process.

The step everyone was “dyeing” for was choosing the colors and patterns to apply to their shirt.

Everyone chose their own pattern and set of colors in which to apply the dye as they completed their shirts, and then they had to let them sit in sealed bags for at least 24 hours before rinsing, washing and drying.

Campers also added finishing touches to their bug sculptures with tempera paint.

Everyone enjoyed our first three-day art camp and were amazed at how quickly the time flew by as they were immersed in the creative process.

Butterfly Day


The Art Junction held it’s second Family Art Day on March 31, 2012 with the theme of Butterflies.

Families had the opportunity to come together to create together.

Butterflies are a wonderful symbol of Spring and the transformation that is taking place in the environment around us during this season.

A butterfly is a mainly day-flying insect  which includes the butterflies and moths. Like other holometabolous insects, the butterfly’s life cycle consists of four parts: egg, larva, pupa and adult.

Butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight. Butterflies comprise the true butterflies (superfamily Papilionoidea), the skippers (superfamily Hesperioidea) and the moth-butterflies (superfamily Hedyloidea).

Butterflies like the Monarch will migrate over long distances. Some butterflies have evolved symbiotic and parasitic relationships with social insects such as ants.

Some butterfly species are pests because in their larval stages they can damage domestic crops or trees; however, some species are agents of pollination of some plants, and caterpillars of a few butterflies (e.g., Harvesters) eat harmful insects.

Culturally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts.

When the butterfly larva is fully grown, hormones are produced. At this point the larva stops feeding and begins “wandering” in the quest of a suitable pupation site, often the underside of a leaf.

The larva transforms into a pupa (or chrysalis) by anchoring itself to a substrate and moulting for the last time. The chrysalis is usually incapable of movement, although some species can rapidly move the abdominal segments or produce sounds to scare potential predators.

The pupal transformation into a butterfly through metamorphosis has held great appeal to mankind. To transform from the miniature wings visible on the outside of the pupa into large structures usable for flight, the pupal wings undergo rapid mitosis and absorb a great deal of nutrients. Let’s see how the creative process is similar to the metamorphosis a butterfly endures.

Participants first painted coffee filter paper which, after drying, transforms into the butterfly wings.

While awaiting the drying process, families had the opportunity to create another type of butterfly.

Employing a technique called a “blotto panting”, families  could create another butterfly.

Blotto painting is a painting made by applying tempera paint onto one side of a sheet of paper, then folding the paper and pressing the two sides together.


Like an inkblot, a blotto painting is apt to be symmetrical and nonobjective. Making one is largely an aleatoric act — leaving much to chance.

Although the concept of symmetry is used in creating half of the butterfly design, much is left up to creative chance or a happy accident.

This project reflects much of the mystery of the creative process…we never quite know what the final results of a creative experience will foster.

This makes a blotto painting a transformative project, much like the pupa becoming a butterfly.

The next step in returning to the 3D butterfly project is to select a plastic bug body and a flexi stem for the antennae and to then put them together.

The final step in transforming the wings is to cut the coffee filter in half and the half shape into a rectangle.

The very last step in creating the wings is to create a thin fan fold from the rectangle shape and insert it into the bug body to create a 3D butterfly.

One of the goals in having a Family Art Day is to allow families the opportunity to create together.

We all have the desire to create something, and in our post-modern society there seem to be few opportunities to come together and create together.

We have many examples around us of the effects of the break-up of the family and community.

It’s time to come together and make a creative, transformitive change in our community.

When various ages work together, unity creates community.

Seeing generations create together passes on traditions and knowledge and understanding of where one lives.

We are not meant to create alone.

We were meant to work as a community, passing on our knowledge as well as learning from others, no matter what their age.

The community is the web of life that inextricably embraces, defines, and empowers children and adults alike. -Peter London

I hope you can join us for future classes, events, gallery exhibitions and creative opportunities to creatively transform our community.