science

Crayon Explosion


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The Art Junction had a fun workshop called Crayon Explosion.

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Participants enjoyed exploring many different methods of using crayons in new and unusual methods.

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Learning to melt crayons was lots of fun for all.

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Painting with crayon was another fun experiment for everyone as they learned to draw with a warm, soft crayon.

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We also created crayons from what was left melted in the muffin tin.

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Everyone enjoyed the creative process.

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Crayon shavings were also used to create melted images with the iron.

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Lots of fun accidents and explorations were had by all participants.

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Working together everyone explored this somewhat familiar medium.

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Maybe you can join us for our next crayon explosion session in the future at the Art Junction.

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Crayon Explosion Workshop


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Crayon Explosion Workshop     

Destroy, melt, create, and paint with crayons in fun, new ways beyond basic coloring!

Date: Saturday, April 20, 2013   10 a.m. -12 noon  

Cost $5.00 with all materials provided. 

Class size 4-10 participants ages 5 to 105

For more information or to reserve your spot call 419-935-3404 or email, theartjunction@yahoo.com

Denver arts community stirs $1.76 billion in economic activity in 2011


 

A visitor to the Clyfford Still Museum in Denver spends a Tuesday morning viewing the various works of art. (Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post)

Denver arts community stirs $1.76 billion in economic activity in 2011

By Jason Blevins The Denver Post

Calling his city “the cultural capital of the West,” Denver Mayor Michael Hancock on Wednesday heralded the $1.76 billion in economic activity stirred by the metro area’s bustling arts community in 2011.

Citing Denver as a leader among U.S. cities climbing out of the recession, Hancock joined several hundred arts supporters early Wednesday in celebrating the financial contribution art and culture provide metro Denver’s economy.

“The arts are a huge component of Denver’s appeal. We all know a smart city needs a diverse economy in order to thrive and that includes a robust culture sector,” Hancock told the Colorado Business Committee for the Arts gathering at downtown’s Four Seasons hotel. “The arts and culture are playing a strong and significant role in our economy.”

Arts and culture indeed do more than entertain and educate metro Denver’s residents and visitors. The CBCA’s biennial economic impact report shows that the 310 organizations of the 23-year-old Scientific and Cultural Facilities District — which spans seven metro counties — delivered a direct economic impact of $527 million in 2011, a 36 percent increase over the 2009 impact.

With indirect spending and capital expenditures, total economic activity was $1.76 billion, up 18.4 percent from 2009.  “If any one of our businesses during this period of time had held steady, we are celebrating success. Thirty-six percent increase from 2009: It is the largest economic impact ever recorded in the history of the SCFD,” said Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce president Kelly Brough. “We have a phrase for that in the business community. When we hear numbers like that we say: ‘Shut the front door.’ ”

More than 2 million visitors from outside Colorado toured Denver’s cultural attractions, including the Clyfford Still Museum. (Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post)

 

Denver’s transition from a gateway to mountain fun into a bona fide tourist destination has been fueled by the metro area’s “cultural renaissance,” said Visit Denver chief Richard Scharf.

More than 2 million visitors from outside of Colorado toured Denver’s cultural attractions in 2011, generating $378 million in spending. “I have to say they all pay taxes, too, that we don’t have to pay,” said Scharf, adding that all but two of the metro area’s top 10 attractions are SCFD-funded.

“We also believe that the brand of the city is built from the ground up,” Scharf said, noting that the sixth annual Denver Arts Week, which kicks off Friday with 250 discounted or free events by 170 metro arts organizations, is designed to help people in Denver understand the importance of the local arts community.

Since its inception in 1989, the taxpayer-supported SCFD has distributed more than $2 billion to metro arts organizations. Since 2001, the district has distributed $424 million to its 310 member groups, including $41.9 million in 2011. Arts, cultural and scientific groups employed 9,354 workers in 2011 — a 7 percent increase over 2009 — with a payroll of $145 million.

$1.76 BILLION: That’s the economic activity in the Denver area’s arts scene — and arts supporters gathered Wednesday to celebrate the financial contribution from art and culture. (Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post)

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics shows arts, entertainment and recreation employment in Colorado — including jobs in cultural, sports, gaming and amusement venues — is up 2.9 percent this year over last year, or about 1,300 jobs. That compares with about 1.7 percent growth for the state overall.

Arts and cultural event attendance reached its second highest peak ever in 2011, with 14.6 million visits fueled by more than 400,000 visitors at the Denver Art Museum’s “King Tut” exhibit and more than 50,000 attending the Colorado Ballet’s “The Nutcracker.”

Nearly 9 million of those tickets were free or reduced, revealing the arts community’s dedication to “being available to everyone,” said Jack Finlaw, chief legal counsel for Gov. John Hickenlooper.

Jason Blevins: 303-954-1374, jblevins@denverpost.com or twitter.com/jasontblevins

Art by the numbers

$145 million: Total payroll for arts, cultural and scientific groups in metro Denver in 2011 , up from $131 million in 2009.

50,460: Volunteers who worked at arts and cultural institutions across metro Denver in 2011, up from 42,226 in 2009.

1,500: New arts and culture jobs added in metro Denver between 2001 and 2011, paying $66 million in salaries.

$203 million: Capital expenditures in arts from 2001 to 2011. Attendance during the decade was 142 million, corporate sponsorships were $102 million.

Source: 2011 Colorado Business Committee for the Arts economic study

Read more: Denver arts community stirs $1.76 billion in economic activity in 2011 – The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_21894627/denver-arts-community-stirs-1-76-billion-economic#ixzz2COJGUQPF

Bead Day


 

On Saturday, November 3, the Art Junction held its first bead workshop.

Participants explored creating clay beads from Sculpey polymer clay.

Exploring was the name of the day as everyone discovered colors and mixing techniques as well as different types of beads to create.

For most of the participants this was a first experience with creating clay beads; everyone learned new techniques and everyone was surprised by how quickly two hours passed for the workshop.

Here are some examples of the beads created on Bead Day.

Circles


This week in our home-school art class we explored the idea of circles in art in a similar fashion to the artist Wassily Kandinsky.

Wassily Kandinsky’s color study, Squares with Concentric Circles.

Wassily Wassilyevich Kandinsky (16 December 1866 – 13 December 1944) was an influential Russian painter and art theorist. He is credited with painting the first purely abstract works. Born in Moscow, Kandinsky spent his childhood in Odessa. He enrolled at the University of Moscow, studying law and economics. Successful in his profession—he was offered a professorship (chair of Roman Law) at the University of Dorpat—he began painting studies (life-drawing, sketching and anatomy) at the age of 30.

The students had a lot of fun folding paper, drawing circles and mixing colors of watercolor paint.

Learning to control the brush in a circular motion is a very difficult task.

This project required a lot of focus and concentration.

Everyone had fun as they explored color through creating concentric circular shapes.

Everyone was surprised at how quickly the time flew by as the creative process was in full swing.

Closing Weekend


Closing weekend for the Art of Drue Roberts at The Art Junction.

The Art Junction presents:

                         The Road So Far…

The artwork of Drue Roberts

Regular Gallery Hours:

Fridays & Saturdays September 14 – October 6, 2012 4:30 – 7:00 p.m.

*Special showings upon request!

 

Drue Roberts graduated from Willard High School in 1993 and went on to study Geology. After graduate school, he became an environmental geologist performing studies at superfund sites, the military and national laboratories. Drue is a self-taught artist who specializes in acrylic painting and has shown his work in Santa Fe, New Mexico and in Ohio. He and his wife have travelled the country and now reside in Granville, Ohio with their two boys.

Art is an extension of the inner artist and there is always some trepidation in sharing so much of one’s self. “When I think of showing my artwork in my hometown, it simply terrifies me,” Roberts shared. “Here I stand at the midpoint of my life worrying how people I haven’t seen in 20 years will react to it. Much of what I’ve spent my life seeing, analyzing and interpreting is wrapped up in these paintings.” A lot of how he sees the world has been colored by his experiences and the culture that exists in Willard, Ohio.

 

Roberts, a geologist by trade who has traveled the country with his work, taught himself to draw and paint. He began with colored pencils and eventually graduated to acrylic paints, which he’s used to develop his unique style of layering paint using bold colors and pronounced light and shadows to produce his diverse themes. Roberts’ experience as a geologist dealing with environmental contamination inspires much of his work. “Presenting an amplified view of our surroundings awakens the viewer to the impact our lives have on the world around us,” he said. He also adds that the murals of Diego Rivera, the sparseness of Edward Hopper and the dinosaurs of William Stout influence his work.

The Road So Far…


The Art Junction presents:

   The Road So Far…

The artwork of Drue Roberts

Opening Reception Saturday, September 8, 2012 4:30 – 6:30 p.m.

at The Art Junction

2634 Prairie Street, New Haven, Ohio 44850 next to the New Haven United Methodist Church

Regular Gallery Hours:

Fridays & Saturdays September 14 – October 6, 2012 4:30 – 7:00 p.m.

*Special showings upon request!

Drue Roberts graduated from Willard High School in 1993 and went on to study Geology. After graduate school, he became an environmental geologist performing studies at superfund sites, the military and national laboratories. Drue is a self-taught artist who specializes in acrylic painting and has shown his work in Santa Fe, New Mexico and in Ohio. He and his wife have travelled the country and now reside in Granville, Ohio with their two boys.

Art is an extension of the inner artist and there is always some trepidation in sharing so much of one’s self. “When I think of showing my artwork in my hometown, it simply terrifies me,” Roberts shared. “Here I stand at the midpoint of my life worrying how people I haven’t seen in 20 years will react to it. Much of what I’ve spent my life seeing, analyzing and interpreting is wrapped up in these paintings.” A lot of how he sees the world has been colored by his experiences and the culture that exists in Willard, Ohio.

Roberts, a geologist by trade who has traveled the country with his work, taught himself to draw and paint. He began with colored pencils and eventually graduated to acrylic paints, which he’s used to develop his unique style of layering paint using bold colors and pronounced light and shadows to produce his diverse themes. Roberts’ experience as a geologist dealing with environmental contamination inspires much of his work. “Presenting an amplified view of our surroundings awakens the viewer to the impact our lives have on the world around us,” he said. He also adds that the murals of Diego Rivera, the sparseness of Edward Hopper and the dinosaurs of William Stout influence his work.

 

The Art Junction is a community-based art education program designed to bring gallery space, local art exhibitions, lessons and creative opportunities to the Willard area for adults, teens, seniors, and children to learn to create together a better community! For more information on this or future programs at the Art Junction contact Kevin Casto M.A., Director, at 419-935-3404, email theartjuction@yahoo.com or visit our blog https://theartjunctionwillardohio.wordpress.com

Exploring Digital Photography at the Art Junction


This summer we have again offered a class on exploring digital photography at the Art Junction.

Participants have been gaining lots of hands-on experience by exploring new techniques.

Participants have been learning to look at the world around them in a new manner, through the rectangle of a view finder, exploring light and composition.

Tonight the class will meet for its third session as they continue to explore the local environment through digital photography.  All of these images were created by class participant and emerging photographer Alec Casto.

Basket weaving workshop


On June 30th the Art Junction held it’s first basket weaving workshop.

Linda Kirgis led the workshop, teaching and demonstrating how to create a small, round reed basket.

What kind of basket should a Beginner start with?
Any simple structure will do.
The students in this workshop created a round made of flat materials. “Round” means a basket that has spokes in a radiating base pattern- like the spokes of a wheel. “Square” means any kind of simple square or rectangular base pattern- woven like a checkerboard. “Melon” means the structure wherein 2 hoops are placed within each other & assembled with God’s eyes patterns.

What are most baskets made of?
Antique American baskets have usually been woven of hardwoods like ash, oak & hickory. However, today most American basketweavers learning to weave use the tropical materials “reed” & “cane”. This is not to say that the hardwoods aren’t used, but they’re expensive and trickier to work with. Most patterns & kits will use reed and cane.

What are “reed” and “cane”?
Reed and cane are the products of the tropical vine “calamus rotang”. They’re harvested in various parts of Asia, then processed in factories into the different sizes of reed and cane. Reed is the inside of the vine, and cane is the outer bark. Cane is also the material used for woven chair seats. Flat reed comes in various widths as measured in fractions of inches: for example, 3/16″, 1/4″, etc. Round reed is measured in numbered sizes. Smallest numbers measure the smallest diameter. #1 is a very narrow weaver (spaghetti-sized), whereas #8 is a good sized spoke (almost pencil sized). Anything larger than #10 is generally furniture-gauged.

Why are basket materials used wet?
Basketry materials are too brittle to be woven in their dry state. When soaked for as little as 15-30 minutes, reed & cane become flexible and easy to manipulate without friction & breakage. 

How long will reed (and baskets) last?
Baskets can last indefinitely if stored in a moderate climate. Not too dry (not in an attic) and not too wet (not in a humid area). Reed, however, has its limitations. The only way to find out if your stored reed is useable for weaving baskets is to soak it for 15 minutes and try it out. If the reed is brittle and continues to break, it’s not worth weaving with.

If my baskets are dusty, what’s the best way to clean them?
Assuming that we’re not talking about priceless antique baskets from early native American periods, the easiest and most efficient way to clean your baskets is with a garden hose. Hose off the dust and let them dry thoroughly. Baskets can also be put in the bathtub so that they freshen up by absorbing moisture directly. Once again, rinse off the dust and let them dry completely to avoid mildew.

The participants did a wonderful job learning a new skill in this creative endeavor of basket weaving.  They also have a great new basket they have made.  If this sounds interesting to you contact the Art Junction to inquire about future classes in beginning and advanced basket weaving at 419-935-3404 or email theartjunction@yahoo.com.

A visit from the Willard City Schools 4th graders


4th graders from the Willard City Schools visited the Art Junction on Friday, May 5, 2012 to view the Willard High School Art Exhibition.

Visiting a local gallery and finding out about others who create art in your town is a new experience for the fourth grade students.

Students learned firsthand there’s a place in their community where they can come together and create art with others.

Experiencing the art of other local students is a new way to connect with one’s community.

Viewing and experiencing art together invigorates the spirit and promotes creative thinking skills.

Viewing the art of other youth inspires these fourth graders to seek more creative opportunities.

Students enjoyed their visit to the gallery and now look forward to their exhibition of monochromatic paintings at the Art Junction on May 12 – June 1, 2012.