paper folding

Snowflakes


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Students at the Willard Hope Center had fun creating snowflakes.

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Everyone learned how to create 4-point and 6-point snowflakes.

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Everyone worked at creating many sizes of snowflakes.

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Students learned that this process is called kirigami.  Kirigami are usually symmetrical, such as snowflakes and is a variation of origami that includes cutting of the paper rather than solely folding the paper as is the case with origami.  Typically, kirigami starts with a folded base, which is then cut; cuts are then opened and flattened to make the finished kirigami.

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All were proud of their creations.

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Here are some examples of the snowflakes made at the Hope Center.

Snowflakes


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The Wednesday afternoon art class has been busy creating snowflakes.

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The process of creating snowflakes begins with basic paper folding.

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Creating snowflakes are based on the art of Kirigami  which is a variation of origami that includes cutting of the paper.

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES Kirigami are usually symmetrical, such as snowflakes, pentagrams, or orchid blossoms.

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Everyone enjoyed creating four-pointed snowflakes.

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The final step was to add a bit of glitter to the snowflakes for some sparkle!

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Everyone was proud of their creations!

Poppies


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Students at the Willard Hope Center created poppies for their Veterans Day Dinner in November.

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The first step was to create the stem of the poppy by twisting two pipe cleaners together.

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The next step was to create a fan fold with five sheets of tissue paper.

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Students picked four red and one black sheet of tissue paper to create their poppy.

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Everyone worked hard to create enough poppies for each veteran attending the dinner.

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Everyone learned why poppies have become a symbol of Veterans Day.

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The poppy has a long association with Veterans Day. But how did the distinctive red flower become such a potent symbol of our remembrance of the sacrifices made in past wars?  Scarlet corn poppies grow naturally in conditions of disturbed earth throughout Western Europe. In late 1914 the fields of Northern France and Flanders were ripped open as World War One raged through Europe’s heart. Once the conflict was over the poppy was one of the only plants to grow on the otherwise barren battlefields.

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The significance of the poppy as a lasting memorial symbol to the fallen was realized by the Canadian surgeon John McCrae in his poem “In Flanders Fields.” The poppy came to represent the immeasurable sacrifice made by his comrades and quickly became a lasting memorial to those who died in World War One and later conflicts. Wearing of poppies has been a custom since 1924 in the United States.

Origami with the Ohio Paper Folders at the Willard Library


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This is a great opportunity for students 4th grade and up and adults plus it’s FREE!

Learn Origami at the Library! Monday February 24 at 5:30pm the Ohio Paper Folders will be at the Willard Memorial Library to teach teens & adults the art of Origami.

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This free program is open to the public . All materials are provided.
 
Be sure to check out the models on display from this great group at the library.

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Ohio Paper Folders is comprised of origami artists who volunteer their time and talents to teach and share their skills and knowledge to ensure the life and development of this art form.

*sign up not required but appreciated*  (419) 933-8564

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Ohio Paper Folders

OPF was founded by Monica Salisbury in July 2007 to deal with the lack of an Ohio Origami group. With weekly notices in local newspapers the group grew to eight members over the following ten months, then quickly jumped to over twenty members after several public seminars.

The group now numbers more than 60, and includes members with a wide range of interests, specialties and skill levels. Members range from “newbies” to a published author of origami books, as well as some very talented designers. Some focus on modular origami, others on complex wet folding.

OPF is primarily a group of origami artists. The members are predominantly Ohioans; we have members in Cleveland, Dayton, Cincinnati, Athens as well as Columbus. We are always happy to welcome new members. Currently there are no fees or dues for membership. The only requirement is an interest in origami and/or paper arts, including kusudama, kirigami, paper making, and paper sculpture. But we are first and foremost an origami group.

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Being origami enthusiasts we are always eager to share models and techniques we’ve learned. We meet monthly to fold and exchange techniques. Everyone is welcome .

We meet on the 3rd Sunday of the month. At this time we are meeting at the McConnell Arts Center. If that should change we’ll post the change on this page.

Our mission as a group is to stretch our abilities in origami but also to participate in and create programs to stimulate interest in and spread awareness of origami.

The prevalent belief about origami is it’s a cute hobby for children but it’s so much more. People aren’t going to realize what it is and can be until we (origamians) start getting out there to show them it really is art.

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http://www.ohiopaperfolders.com/#

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