oil based clay

Clay


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Working with clay is always fun at the Willard Hope Center.

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There seems to be something to the hand-building experience that draws all of the students to want to work with clay.

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Everyone enjoyed the process of working with clay.

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Clay grabs the attention and focus of the students like few other mediums we explore.

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The Hope Center in Willard offers many great after-school opportunities for kids in Willard.

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The Art Junction enjoys giving the students an art experience with only creative expectations.

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It’s great to see everyone take the time to unplug and be creative.

Clay monsters


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Wednesday afternoon art students explored clay for their last class of the autumn session.

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Students explored basic clay concepts as they learned how to use the clay and form various geometrical shapes.

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Students created a basic pinch pot and began to transform it into a clay monster.

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Everyone was focused on the building process.

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Students were given the opportunity to incorporate craft sticks, wire, beads and pipe cleaners into their monster creations.

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Everyone enjoyed the process and working with the clay.

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Each student had a different method of creating their clay monster.

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It’s fun to see how each student takes the creative process in a different direction.

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I hope you have enjoyed seeing their clay monsters created out of oil-based clay and a few odds and ends around our studio.  Maybe you can join us for our next session this winter?

Wednesday afternoonartclasseswinterl2015

Exploring clay


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The Wednesday afternoon art class recently explored the medium of oil-based clay.

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Students explored many different building techniques as they learned how to work with this type of clay.

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Students created clay coils and ropes and learned how to build with rope coils.

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Everyone enjoyed exploring and learning new building techniques with oil-based clay.

Exploring clay


For the last class of the winter session, the home-school art students explored using oil-based clay.

Oil-based clays are made from various combinations of oils, waxes, and clay minerals. Because the oils do not evaporate as does water, oil-based clays remain malleable even when left for long periods in dry environments.

Oil-based clay is not soluble in water. It can be re-used and so is a popular material for animation artists who need to rework their models. It is available in a multitude of colors and is non-toxic. Oil-based clays are referred to by a number of genericized trademarks.

Oil-based clays are also suitable for the creation of detailed sculptures from which a mold can be made. Castings and reproductions in a much more durable material can then be produced. Items made from oil-based clays are not fired, and therefore are not ceramics. Because the viscosity of oils are inversely related to temperature, the malleability can be influenced by heating or cooling the clay.

Students learned about building with clay through various methods of slab, coil and pinching the clay.

Students explored hand-building traditional three dimensional shapes.

Students learned to roll coils, spheres and cylinders.

Part of the fun was exploring all of the many things your hands can do to turn clay into many exciting and wonderful three-dimensional objects.