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The 7th Annual Community Summer Art Exhibition


2018 Summer Art Exhibit

Come view the wonderful local art, see the images of the 7th Annual Community Summer Art Exhibition.

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You will be supporting local visual artists of north central Ohio.

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Who knows; you might find some art to decorate your life! This exhibit is composed of 17 local, area and regional artists who are exhibiting over 40 items composed of paintings, watercolors, pastels, fiber and photography through the Willard, Greenwich, North Fairfield and Wakeman branches of the Huron County Community Library for this exhibition and contest.

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         When you support local art from an independent artist you are buying more than just a painting, drawing or photograph. You are buying hundreds of hours of experimentation and thousands of failures. You are buying days, weeks, months, years of frustration and moments of pure joy. You are not just viewing a thing; you are viewing a piece of a heart, a part of a soul, a private moment in someone’s life. Most importantly, you are participating with the artist and providing them encouragement for something they are truly passionate about! That’s why we hope you will join us and view our Summer Art Exhibition!

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On Saturday, August 4, 2018 join us for the opening celebration of this exhibit! Local musician Mike White will be performing on guitar, and homemade ice cream will be served by members of the New Haven United Methodist Church on the lawn next to their Community Prayer Garden, which is next to the Art Junction, from 6:30 – 8:30 pm.

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Regular gallery hours for the Summer Art Exhibition will be Fridays & Saturdays, August 4 – 25, 2018 from 5:00 – 7:00 pm.

The Art Junction is located at 2634 Prairie Street in New Haven, OH (next to the New Haven United Methodist Church.)

*Special Showings Available Upon Request!

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Clock Tower Fundraiser/Auction

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We are auctioning off a watercolor painting of the Willard Clock Tower by former Willard artist Teruko Wilde who now creates and resides in Taos, New Mexico.

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Teruko Wilde was born in Nagoya, Japan. After moving to the United States as a teenager she studied at the University of Cincinnati and Columbus College of Art and Design in Ohio. An award-winning artist, Ms. Wilde has had numerous one-person and group shows. She initially established herself as a prominent pastel and watercolor artist before moving to Taos, NM in 1986. Expansive southwestern skies, approaching storms, and moody sunsets describe the colorful oil paintings of Teruko Wilde, which became known as her ‘Southwest Series’ and have been in popular demand for more than a decade. She has said that Mother Nature creates beautiful artwork in her sunsets, mountains, and trees…Ms. Wilde believes that it is her job as a fine artist to alter and reinterpret that beauty into beautiful and joyful paintings.

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This painting auction is to help raise funds for the Willard Clock Tower.

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The painting will be on display at The Art Junction in New Haven at the 7th Annual Community Art Exhibit from Saturday August 4, 2018 from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

Regular gallery hours for the Summer Art Exhibition will be Fridays & Saturdays, August 4 – 25, 2018 from 5:00 – 7:00 pm.

The Art Junction is located at 2634 Prairie Street in New Haven, OH (next to the New Haven United Methodist Church.)

*Special Showings Available Upon Request!

2018 Summer Art Exhibit

Bids will be accepted at the Art Junction through August 25, 2018.

Bids can also be emailed to theartjunction@yahoo.com

This auction will end after the Planes, Trains and Automobiles Event in September in downtown Willard.

Buy a piece of Willard history to help replace a piece of Willard history!

The Art Junction is a community-based art education program designed to bring gallery space, local art exhibitions, lessons and creative opportunities to the Willard area for adults, teens, seniors, and children to learn to create together a better community! The Art Junction is a ministry of the New Haven United Methodist Church.  For more information on this or future programs at The Art Junction contact Kevin Casto M.A., Director, at 419-935-3404, email theartjuction@yahoo.com or visit our blog https://theartjunctionwillardohio.wordpress.com on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Art-Junction/190323094344714?ref=hl

 

Family Art Day


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Join us for Family Art Day on Saturday, March 24, 2018.

On one Saturday morning your family can paint and

decorate a paper mache egg as you join us in

celebrating spring and renewal!

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Cost is $5.00 per family (this helps to cover the cost of materials)

plus a canned food donation for the Willard Food Bank!

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Enjoy a free lunch next door at the New Haven United Methodist Church as well as other crafts and activities.

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Mail your registration to:

Kevin Casto

802 S. Main St.

Willard, Ohio 44890

email theartjunction@yahoo.com

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For more information contact Kevin Casto at 419-935-3404 or email: theartjunction@yahoo.com

The Art Junction is located at 2634 Prairie Street New Haven, OH next to the New Haven United Methodist Church.

The Art Junction is a community-based art education program designed to bring gallery space, local art exhibitions, lessons and creative opportunities to the Willard area for adults, teens, seniors, and children to learn to create together a better community! The Art Junction is a ministry of the New Haven United Methodist Church. For more information on this or future programs at The Art Junction contact Kevin Casto M.A., Director, at 419-935-3404, email theartjuction@yahoo.com or visit our blog https://theartjunctionwillardohio.wordpress.com on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Art-Junction/190323094344714?ref=hl

 

Tuesday afternoon art classes


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Classes will cover art history, visual & motor skills, principals of art & design, creative thinking, basic drawing, painting and 3D art concepts as well as integrate with basic educational concepts of math, science, language and history.

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Come explore ART and have some fun!
Cost: Cost $30 a student for 5 sessions Instructor supplies all materials!

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Dates: Beginning Tuesday, January 16 – February 13, 2018

 4:05-4:45 p.m. 1st– 5th grade students

4:45-5:30 p.m. 6th grade – Adults

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*If bad weather cancels Willard City Schools –Art Classes will be canceled and a make-up date will be added.

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For more information contact Kevin Casto at 419-935-3404 or email: theartjunction@yahoo.com

The Art Junction is located at 2634 Prairie Street New Haven, OH. Next to the New Haven United Methodist Church.

Tuesday AfterNoon Fall Art Classes


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Classes will cover art history, visual & motor skills, principals of art & design, creative thinking, basic drawing, painting and 3D art concepts as well as integrate with basic educational concepts of math, science, language and history.

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Cost: $25.00 a student for 5 sessions Students are responsible for all of their art materials!

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Cost $30 a student for 5 sessions Instructor supplies all materials!

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Dates: Beginning Tuesday, October 4 – November 1, 2016

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4:05-4:45 pm 1st– 6th grade students

4:50-5:30 pm 7th – 12th grade students Adults are welcome for this session

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*If bad weather cancels Willard City Schools –Art Classes will be canceled and a make-up date will be added.

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For more information contact Kevin Casto at 419-935-3404 or email: theartjunction@yahoo.com

The Art Junction is located at 2634 Prairie Street New Haven, OH. Next to the New Haven United Methodist Church.

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The Art Junction is a community-based art education program designed to bring gallery space, local art exhibitions, lessons and creative opportunities to the Willard area for adults, teens, seniors, and children to learn to create together a better community! The Art Junction is a ministry of the New Haven United Methodist Church.  For more information on this or future programs at The Art Junction contact Kevin Casto M.A., Director, at 419-935-3404, email theartjuction@yahoo.com or visit our blog https://theartjunctionwillardohio.wordpress.com on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Art-Junction/190323094344714?ref=hl

Community-based Art for Social Change


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By Kathie deNobriga and Mat Schwarzman

Community-based art is creative expression that emerges from communities of people working together to improve their individual and collective circumstances.

Community-based art involves a wide range of social contexts and definitions, and includes an understanding of “communities” that includes not only geographical places, but also groups of people identified with historical or ethnic traditions, or dedicated to a particular belief or spirit. Those who identify themselves as community-based artists are concerned with the ways art can function within many different types of public arenas, including community development, corrections, education, intergenerational communication, aging, the environment, healthcare, technology, politics, disability, conflict resolution, community regeneration, cultural citizenship and more. They are working in all media, in all disciplines, in all locations. They can be found in traditional galleries, theaters, museums and centers of higher learning, as well as hospitals, unions, community centers, prisons, community-based organizing groups, wilderness areas, youth organizations and juvenile halls, and public schools.

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They are committed to bringing the arts to bear on the widest possible range of social conditions and challenges facing our communities. This includes, but is not limited to, issues of racism, sexism, homophobia, ageism, classism, ableism, and all forms of discrimination that systematically deny individuals’ rights and opportunities because of physical traits, family background or social identity. These efforts seek to create social change at every level of society, from the most “personal” to the most “political.”

At the heart of this social vision is a belief in cultural and creative expression as a means to affecting deep and lasting social change.

Laws may be altered, court decisions may be handed down, officials may be voted in and out of office–but if the majority of the people do not believe in the possibility and the rightness of their/our common cause, nothing authentic or long-lasting will be changed. This is where art, artists and artist educators play an essential role. If we want freedom, we must promote free expression. If we want equity, we must have equal access and support in expressing ourselves. If we want respect and love and beauty among us and all our many communities, we must actively and systematically promote it through our art and through our teaching of others. Teaching, in this sense, becomes a political act, a conscious effort to build a movement of people prepared to facilitate and participate in social change.

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Community art is by its nature dialectical. It is an expression of both individual and group identity.

All creative expression, no matter how “original,” is an expression of both individual and group life. In recognizing this, community art distinguishes itself from more conventional Western approaches in both vocabulary and theoretical approach. Instead of being viewed as an isolated individual genius, the artist (or artists) serves as a cultural catalyst, an integral part of a larger process of social intervention and transformation.  Through art, we can challenge many of our society’s deepest-seated assumptions, such as the boundaries between self and other, “artist” and “non-artist,” present and past, male and female, young and old, “normal” and “abnormal.” The community artist builds upon the power of artistic creation and expression to spark new ideas and elicit new actions, both from people who participate in the creative process and those who witness its results.

Art can catalyze critical thinking, inspire individuals to work together, create visions, heal.This energy, in turn, helps catalyze, inspire and heal the community artist who facilities its development.

*This article was written in 1999, as an introduction to the Community Arts Training (CAT) Directory, a list of individuals and organizations offering quality training in the field of community arts.

http://artsintransformation.wordpress.com/2010/03/10/community-based-art-for-social-change/

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Community-Based Art Can Be a Significant Force for Social Change


great-wall-of-los-angelesThe Great Wall of Los Angeles depicts the history of LA, with special emphasis on Native Americans and minorities.

Written by Tim Takechi 

from The official blog of Global Visionaries

The arts are supposed to be a vehicle for social change. So why doesn’t it seem like it?

As school districts and universities across the country face massive budget cuts from federal and state governments, funding for the arts (including both performance-based and visual) is expected to be threatened.

After all, doesn’t it make sense to cut programs that don’t help our students improve math and science test scores? How does your skill with a paint brush or violin help you make advances in environmental engineering? Or compete with China? Or India? You get the idea.

So before we delve into an obvious rant about how the arts are essential to a healthy society, it is important to note that critics have a strong argument for wanting to focus more attention on math and science.

American students are our future. As the Baby Boomer generation starts to approach retirement age, there will soon be a large talent gap in important areas of social infrastructure such as education and engineering.

It is important that we have plenty of fresh young minds take over these jobs when the present generation decides to leave. Now you can see why certain government officials have little problem cutting music, theatre and visual arts funding.

So what can be done to preserve our nation’s artistic output given these shrinking budgets?

That’s where community-based art comes into play.

What is community-based art, you may ask? Let us explain:

Community-based art is any art created with the purpose of engaging a particular community (defined by any geographical or demographic boundaries you see fit) into a larger dialogue with the purpose of generating positive change.

A great example of a community-based arts organization is The Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC), an organization serving the larger Los Angeles area. SPARC strives to give a voice to and celebrate LA’s ethnically and economically diverse population. They focus especially on “women, the working poor, youth, the elderly and newly arrived immigrant communities.”

One of SPARC’s most famous projects is The Great Wall of Los Angeles, a half a mile long wall featuring artwork encouraging interracial harmony.

Also check out Jumblies Theatre located in Toronto, Canada. Jumblies is dedicated to building relationships between multicultural artists and their larger community through partnerships, arts ventures, education and workshops.

Consider Jumblies’ most recent venture, The Scarborough Project. It is a community arts training program based in one of Toronto’s most ethnically diverse municipalities. Reaching out to Scarborough’s large immigrant population, Jumblies works to empower the community through artistic expression.

Closer to home, Barbara Luecke is the Sound Transit Art Program Manager and parent of a former Global Visionaries participant. Since 2006, Barbara has overseen and coordinated more than 50 arts projects integrated in light rail, commuter rail and bus express facilities all over Seattle.

One striking piece of art that can be found at a Light Rail station is a sculpture entitled “Rainier Beach Haiku” designed by Japanese-American artist and retired university professor Roger Shimomura. Located at the Othello Station in Rainier Valley, Shimomura’s humorous sculpture explores the difficulty of living in two different cultures at the same time.

rainier-beach-haiku“Rainier Beach Haiku” by Japanese-American artist Roger Shimomura sits at the Othello Station.

4Culture, a cultural service agency serving the King County area, kicked off their 2010 Site-Specific series by hosting the Red Eagle Soaring Native Youth Theatre’s musical re-enactment of the 1970 historical take-over of Fort Lawton.

Red Eagle Soaring Native Youth Theatre engages “Native Indian and Alaskan Native youth to express themselves with confidence and clarity through traditional and contemporary performing arts.” RES has staged more than 130 productions with youth ages 11-19.

All these organizations will agree that it’s better for people to express themselves through art than violence. Too often marginalized folks feel the only way they can empower themselves is by committing crimes against society. The people of SPARC and Jumblies Theatre want to reverse that by creating public art in a spirit of inclusiveness.

Organizations such as Arts Corps and 4Culture do not in any way represent an alternative to public school arts programs. Instead, they illustrate that there are other venues for empowering young people to artistically express themselves that go beyond the four walls of a school building.

wing-luke-asian-museumWing Luke Asian Museum features art created by Asian-American artists.

These organizations, like all nonprofits, are funded through a combination of public and private money. None of these folks are out to get rich. That is not why they do what they do. People like Barbara Luecke and Roger Shimomura are motivated by a desire to improve communities through arts engagement.  Too often communities are forced to come together after tragedies like natural disasters and violent acts.

Community-based art is a fantastic way for people from diverse backgrounds to come together in a healthy, constructive and vibrant manner.

If your local school is planning to cut funding for the arts, don’t be afraid that our artistic legacy is lost. There is reason to have hope. In times of need, sometimes all it takes are a dedicated group of people, a dream and the will to make magic happen.

Obviously, it is preferable that funding for the arts continues in public schools. But if that doesn’t seem possible, don’t feel like it’s a lost cause.

Just research all the projects mentioned above. Most of them started on a shoe-string budget and continue to exist today. Unfortunately, we cannot change cuts to education spending. That is left to politicians. What we can do is take heart that there are other venues for cultivating tomorrow’s artists.

They might not be found in a classroom. You might have to take a peak outside your window.

http://gvisionaries.wordpress.com/2011/03/09/community-based-art-can-be-a-significant-force-for-social-change/