hand-made

BEGINNING FUSED-GLASS JEWELRY


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Saturday, March 18, 2017 from 10 am – 1 pm  

2 Sessions to complete this workshop

         & Saturday, March 25, 2017 from 10 am – 11 am  

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Discover the basics of glass fusing over 2 classes with Jill Groves.

You will learn how to create beautiful works of wearable art by layering art glass and fusing the glass in a kiln.

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Each student will make 2 from the following choices:

pendant, pin or pair of earrings. The first class is 3 hours long. The first hour is an introduction of art glass, kilns, effects of heat on glass, etc. The second hour includes instruction on glass cutting and equipment. The remainder of the class is spent choosing and layering glass.

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At the next session, we will add bails,earring wires, posts or pins to our finished pieces. No experience with glass is required for this course,which is recommended for beginners.

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Cost $30.00 before 3/4/17     after 3/4/17 $35.

Class size minimum of 5 maximum 12

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Sign Up & Prepay for Today!

for more information call 419-935-3404  

Class Size is Limited

Cash accepted or make checks out to Kevin Casto

*must prepare for Fused Glass Workshop!

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Mail your registration to

Kevin Casto

                          802 S. Main St.                      

Willard, Ohio 44890

email theartjunction@yahoo.com

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 For more information contact Kevin Casto at 419-935-3404 or email: theartjunction@yahoo.com

The Art Junction is located at 2634 Prairie Street New Haven, OH. Next to the New Haven United Methodist Church.

 

The Art Junction is a community-based art education program designed to bring gallery space, local art exhibitions, lessons and creative opportunities to the Willard area for adults, teens, seniors, and children to learn to create together a better community! The Art Junction is a ministry of the New Haven United Methodist Church.  For more information on this or future programs at The Art Junction contact Kevin Casto M.A., Director, at 419-935-3404, email theartjuction@yahoo.com or visit our blog https://theartjunctionwillardohio.wordpress.com on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Art-Junction/190323094344714?ref=hl

 

 

Fused glass jewelry


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The Art Junction hosted our first fused glass workshop this fall.

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Jill Groves led this wonderful workshop, instructing the participants on how to create jewelry.

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Jill demonstrated the process as she showed the class how to begin.

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Students viewed examples of Jill’s work as they decided what type of jewelry they wished to create.

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There were many types and colors of glass to choose from.

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The creative process began as students cut their glass.

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There were many wonderful ideas explored in this workshop.

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A project before the firing process.

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Finishing touches.

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Looking at the finished jewelry.

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The last step was to put backings on the necklaces and ear rings.

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This was a wonderful workshop where everyone was able to put their own personalized touches on their own fused glass jewelry.  I hope you can join us for our next fused glass workshop in March.

Basket weaving workshop


On June 30th the Art Junction held it’s first basket weaving workshop.

Linda Kirgis led the workshop, teaching and demonstrating how to create a small, round reed basket.

What kind of basket should a Beginner start with?
Any simple structure will do.
The students in this workshop created a round made of flat materials. “Round” means a basket that has spokes in a radiating base pattern- like the spokes of a wheel. “Square” means any kind of simple square or rectangular base pattern- woven like a checkerboard. “Melon” means the structure wherein 2 hoops are placed within each other & assembled with God’s eyes patterns.

What are most baskets made of?
Antique American baskets have usually been woven of hardwoods like ash, oak & hickory. However, today most American basketweavers learning to weave use the tropical materials “reed” & “cane”. This is not to say that the hardwoods aren’t used, but they’re expensive and trickier to work with. Most patterns & kits will use reed and cane.

What are “reed” and “cane”?
Reed and cane are the products of the tropical vine “calamus rotang”. They’re harvested in various parts of Asia, then processed in factories into the different sizes of reed and cane. Reed is the inside of the vine, and cane is the outer bark. Cane is also the material used for woven chair seats. Flat reed comes in various widths as measured in fractions of inches: for example, 3/16″, 1/4″, etc. Round reed is measured in numbered sizes. Smallest numbers measure the smallest diameter. #1 is a very narrow weaver (spaghetti-sized), whereas #8 is a good sized spoke (almost pencil sized). Anything larger than #10 is generally furniture-gauged.

Why are basket materials used wet?
Basketry materials are too brittle to be woven in their dry state. When soaked for as little as 15-30 minutes, reed & cane become flexible and easy to manipulate without friction & breakage. 

How long will reed (and baskets) last?
Baskets can last indefinitely if stored in a moderate climate. Not too dry (not in an attic) and not too wet (not in a humid area). Reed, however, has its limitations. The only way to find out if your stored reed is useable for weaving baskets is to soak it for 15 minutes and try it out. If the reed is brittle and continues to break, it’s not worth weaving with.

If my baskets are dusty, what’s the best way to clean them?
Assuming that we’re not talking about priceless antique baskets from early native American periods, the easiest and most efficient way to clean your baskets is with a garden hose. Hose off the dust and let them dry thoroughly. Baskets can also be put in the bathtub so that they freshen up by absorbing moisture directly. Once again, rinse off the dust and let them dry completely to avoid mildew.

The participants did a wonderful job learning a new skill in this creative endeavor of basket weaving.  They also have a great new basket they have made.  If this sounds interesting to you contact the Art Junction to inquire about future classes in beginning and advanced basket weaving at 419-935-3404 or email theartjunction@yahoo.com.

Tye-Dye Workshop


TyeDye Workshop

Have you always wanted to create a Tyedye T-shirt?

    This is your chance to learn how with your friends and family. 

     Date: Saturday, July 14, 2012

10 a.m. -12noon   Cost $15.00  Ages 10 & up!

Class Size: Must have at least 8 for a class for material cost!  

Must sign up by July 2, 2012

Materials Needed: Must provide your own shirt(s)

For more information or to sign up call 419-935-3404 or email theartjunction@yahoo.com

Create your own Basket Workshop


Linda Kirgis will teach you how to make a small, round reed basket.

The basket will be from 5-1/2” to 8-1/2” in diameter (your choice) & will be woven from flat reed and round reed.

You will have the opportunity to weave in the color of your choice.

 Cost $25 includes all supplies.

We have extended the deadline -Sign up by June 16, 2012

The tools are simple and will be provided for your use during the class.

Class Size 6-8 people participants Ages 10 and up

 Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012 

9 a.m.-1 p.m.

(or until all baskets are completed.) Please feel free to bring along snacks,drinks or a lunch for yourself.

To sign up for this workshop email: theartjunction@yahoo.com  or call 419-935-3404