creating

Candy cane day


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Family Art Day was held on December 5, 2015.  We had a large attendance this year.

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Everyone enjoyed creating a candy cane from sculpey clay.

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It was a fun day for families to come and build a memory together for the Christmas season.

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Everyone enjoyed the simple building process and working with their hands.

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The Art Junction enjoys sponsoring events that bring families together with art to create a stronger community.

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There was a wonderful, wide variety of colors used to create the canes this year.

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We had a great time at this year’s Family Art Day.  A big thanks to New Haven United Methodist Church for helping with this event and serving a lunch along with crafts and hosting a community Christmas tree in the square this year.

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Thanks also to the Artists’ Open Studio for exhibiting their work during Family Art Day.

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Maybe you can join us for our Spring Family Art Day coming in March 2016.

Winter landscapes


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The Wednesday afternoon art classes created mixed-medium landscapes this week.

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We began with creating a horizon line and using watercolors for our sky.

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The next step was cutting out trees with scissors and construction paper.

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This required a lot of focus as the scissors became a tool for drawing the trees through the cutting process.

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Next was gluing the trees to the landscape.

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The final step was to add shadow to the trees with watercolor paint.

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Everyone enjoyed learning to mix mediums to create a wonderful winter landscape.

Creating togetherness


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It’s great to see families come together to create together at our Family Art Day.  Everyone has fun and a wonderful memory is made along with some great art!

What an Arts Education Meant to Me


gravityby Anna Musky-Goldwyn

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anna-muskygoldwyn/what-an-arts-education-meant_b_3641930.html?utm_hp_ref=tw

I recently started volunteering at an LA-based non-profit called P.S. ARTS that brings funded arts education to various Los Angeles public school districts. Art classes in school have always felt like a very special and necessary thing and with all of the cuts we see these days around the country, it gave me a little bit of solace to know there was an organization out there trying to remedy that gap. On getting involved, one of the things they asked me about was what my arts education meant to me. I started to contemplate that and it seemed like this vast array of color and enthusiasm that I would never be able to navigate. But then when I started to narrow it down a bit, I came to the obvious, and important conclusion, that without an arts education, I would not be the person I am today.

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It’s hard to think about where it all began — the decision to be an artist, of sorts, for the rest of my life. I can link it back to so many things, but one of my earliest memories pops into mind. When I was in preschool, we did a production of Henny Penny (‘the sky is falling, the sky is falling’). True to my nature, I was a bit grumpy when I found out I would only have the small role of being one of the baby foxes, while my other friends got to play the leads. I was four, so forgive me if my memory of it isn’t sharp, but even though I was just a baby fox, not a goose, not a hen, I felt this enormous sense of ownership of the play, of my role, of being in this show that took place in our tiny classroom in the basement of a New Jersey townhouse. I would not relent, I would not mess up, I would not forget my lines. Even though I respected the roles of my classmates and teachers, as much as any four-year-old can comprehend that idea of that, I felt that this play was mine and it has thus stuck in my mind almost twenty years later.

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So what did I want to be when I grew up? I wanted to be that same kid I was at age four. I wanted ownership of something creative, to be proud of and responsible for something larger than myself. The various avenues that art classes throughout elementary, middle, and high school took me down led to unknown places with different people. They showed me skills I didn’t know I had, but more importantly, introduced me to as many ways I could imagine of expressing myself. It always sounded corny, ‘expressing yourself.’ Did I really need the help to say who I was, how I felt? The answer for most of us is, yes. We do. We need an immense amount of help to really get to the core of it, to find ourselves in a better, more secure place.

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There was a moment in middle school when I was asked to join an afterschool arts program. Now, who is to say how my middle school art teachers really judged that my artistic capacity was good enough for this program? But, it felt like a sort of validation, and I think for some reason validation proves important for anyone. Beyond this validation though, this program taught me what really matters about art — community. Living in a town where the cool thing was sports, where it was okay to be smart, but sometimes not quite as okay to be an artist or a theater kid, it felt like a gift to be with other preteens going through their awkward phase who were also into making things, telling stories, creating. There was no judgment from one another — okay there was some… But for the most part we had fun, we threw pottery and made dirty jokes. We painted on large canvases and ate bagels. It was the perfect environment for a middle-school artist. Things happened in this space that meant something to the thirteen-year-old me. I made one of my closest friends, I got to (proudly) turn down a boy who ‘asked me out’, I listened to cool bands on other kids’ mp3 players (pre-iPod), I felt like there was a little place for me in this weird conglomerate of students.

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That was what I wanted. That was what I always felt, from that point on, what I deserved as a creative person — other creative people. My arts education from an early age taught me that that was possible. When I started talking (not singing, talking) to myself in the shower, reciting made up exchanges of dialogue between two fictional people in my imagination, I suspected all hope was lost. When I started writing these weird things down, I was sure all hope was lost. I would be a writer. It took me a while to get to the point where I pursued it, but in a way I always knew. I didn’t mind writing essays, and when I would force myself to write in a journal I felt a sort of liberation. I went through my teenage years and into my early twenties always having a feeling about this, but never being quite certain. Now that I’ve committed, made up my mind, found myself extending my education to become a screenwriter, it all seems to clear. All I ever wanted was to feel like four-year-old me again. I wanted to be that baby fox, experience the excitement of storytelling. I wanted to recognize again what it felt like to have people surrounding me who don’t judge on who my friends are or what sport I play, but who want to read my writing, and in film school and in the larger scope of Los Angeles, I’ve found that. I want to tell stories. My chosen medium, for the time being, is through words and through imaginary people. But, having had the privilege to learn about and create all kinds of art as a kid, a teenager, and an adult, it’s clear that storytelling is universal, each us just needs to find our medium.

Follow Anna Musky-Goldwyn on Twitter: www.twitter.com/amuskygoldwyn

Spring Classes and Workshops


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Paper Flower Workshop

Create a paper flower for Mom or a Spring bouquet for your home.

Date:  Saturday, May 4, 10 a.m. – 12 noon

Class Size 4-10 participants ages 10 and up

Cost $ 5.00 with all materials provided

Sign up by 5/2/13

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Crayon Explosion Workshop     

Destroy, melt, create, and paint with crayons in fun new ways beyond basic coloring!

Date: Saturday, April 20, 2013   10 a.m. – 12noon  

Cost $5.00 with all materials provided

Sign up by 4/18/13 

Class size 4-10 participants Ages 5 to 105

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Painting with Expression Class

Explore painting with expression with acrylic paint.

Materials Needed: 16” x 20” canvas, basic acrylic paints, brushes, masking tape, towels.  

Cost $ 10.00 or  $25.00 with all materials provided

Date: Tuesday, April 9 – Tuesday, May 14, 2013 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. 

Class size 4-8 participants ages 9 to 99

Sign up by 4/5/13

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For more information contact Kevin Casto at 419-935-3404 or email: theartjunction@yahoo.com

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The Art Junction is a community-based art education program designed to bring gallery space, local art exhibitions, lessons and creative opportunities to the Willard area for adults, teens, seniors, and children to learn to create together a better community! For more information on this or future programs at The Art Junction contact Kevin Casto M.A., Director, at 419-935-3404, email theartjuction@yahoo.com or visit our blog https://theartjunctionwillardohio.wordpress.com

Family Art Day


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Butterflies returned to the Art Junction today.

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Families came to the Art Junction on Saturday, March 23, 2013 to participate in creating clay butterflies and to help celebrate the return of spring.

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Our weather was still very winter-like, but our thoughts turned to spring and the renewal that will return to north-central Ohio soon.

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Families worked together to create butterflies from air-dry clay.

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Everyone had the opportunity to add paint to their creation as well.

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Crayola® Air-Dry Clay is a natural earth clay which air-dries to a hard solid. It can be used it to make clay sculptures, decorative items or plaques. No baking or firing needed. Easy clean-up. Minimal shrinkage.

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You can use most traditional clay sculpting techniques with Air-Dry Clay, such as coil, slab, pinch, score-and-weld.

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A butterfly is a mainly day-flying insect which includes moths.

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Butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight.  Some, like the Monarch, will migrate over long distances. A few butterflies eat harmful insects. Culturally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts.

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Everyone enjoyed the creative process of making a butterfly today.

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Maybe you can join us for a class, workshop, gallery opening or our next family art day.

 

Art Camp -Day 2


Campers began day 2 with working on the yard art composition.

After yesterday’s introduction to the yard art concept, today everyone really sprang into the creative process.

Campers were thoughtful in their placement of sprayed shapes in the continuing design.

Everyone participated in the ever-evolving yard art design.

A view of the work from above.

Yard art viewed from the second story window.

The second project was creating a 3-d sculptural bug.

Using cardboard, campers designed and cut out the shapes of their bug sculpture with a little aid from Artman.

After assembling their bugs the painting process begins.

Painting is always lots of fun!

Art Campers were very busy today having fun in all their creative endeavors!

Kids Exploring Art


 Need some creativity in your summer?

Dates:  July 16-17, 2012      10 a.m.-12noon   

Cost $15.00           Ages 5-7         Class Size: 8-10 Students

Must sign up by June 30, 2012   

All Materials Provided!

2 days of Painting, Chalk Art, Drawing, Sculpture & Crayon Making

Call 419-935-3404 to sign up or email: theartjunction@yahoo.com

Paper mache pottery -week 1


We began our new class creating paper mache pottery this past week.

Participants learned about basic paper folding methods as well as various methods of building pottery.

Materials are very simple to begin with: newspaper and masking tape.

Learning how to create a coil out of paper is very similar to creating a coil out of clay….only with a different medium.

The next step is to learn how to roll up the coil to create the base of the pot.

Just like regular pottery, paper mache pottery is a very hands-on project.

Coiling is a method of creating pottery.  This method has been used in a variety of ways. Using the coiling technique, it is possible to build thicker or taller walled vessels, which may not have been possible using earlier methods. The technique permits control of the walls as they are built up and allows building on top of the walls to make the vessel look bigger and bulge outward or narrow inward with less danger of collapsing.

Next week we will begin the process of building the pottery after creating many coils.

 

Butterfly Day


The Art Junction held it’s second Family Art Day on March 31, 2012 with the theme of Butterflies.

Families had the opportunity to come together to create together.

Butterflies are a wonderful symbol of Spring and the transformation that is taking place in the environment around us during this season.

A butterfly is a mainly day-flying insect  which includes the butterflies and moths. Like other holometabolous insects, the butterfly’s life cycle consists of four parts: egg, larva, pupa and adult.

Butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight. Butterflies comprise the true butterflies (superfamily Papilionoidea), the skippers (superfamily Hesperioidea) and the moth-butterflies (superfamily Hedyloidea).

Butterflies like the Monarch will migrate over long distances. Some butterflies have evolved symbiotic and parasitic relationships with social insects such as ants.

Some butterfly species are pests because in their larval stages they can damage domestic crops or trees; however, some species are agents of pollination of some plants, and caterpillars of a few butterflies (e.g., Harvesters) eat harmful insects.

Culturally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts.

When the butterfly larva is fully grown, hormones are produced. At this point the larva stops feeding and begins “wandering” in the quest of a suitable pupation site, often the underside of a leaf.

The larva transforms into a pupa (or chrysalis) by anchoring itself to a substrate and moulting for the last time. The chrysalis is usually incapable of movement, although some species can rapidly move the abdominal segments or produce sounds to scare potential predators.

The pupal transformation into a butterfly through metamorphosis has held great appeal to mankind. To transform from the miniature wings visible on the outside of the pupa into large structures usable for flight, the pupal wings undergo rapid mitosis and absorb a great deal of nutrients. Let’s see how the creative process is similar to the metamorphosis a butterfly endures.

Participants first painted coffee filter paper which, after drying, transforms into the butterfly wings.

While awaiting the drying process, families had the opportunity to create another type of butterfly.

Employing a technique called a “blotto panting”, families  could create another butterfly.

Blotto painting is a painting made by applying tempera paint onto one side of a sheet of paper, then folding the paper and pressing the two sides together.


Like an inkblot, a blotto painting is apt to be symmetrical and nonobjective. Making one is largely an aleatoric act — leaving much to chance.

Although the concept of symmetry is used in creating half of the butterfly design, much is left up to creative chance or a happy accident.

This project reflects much of the mystery of the creative process…we never quite know what the final results of a creative experience will foster.

This makes a blotto painting a transformative project, much like the pupa becoming a butterfly.

The next step in returning to the 3D butterfly project is to select a plastic bug body and a flexi stem for the antennae and to then put them together.

The final step in transforming the wings is to cut the coffee filter in half and the half shape into a rectangle.

The very last step in creating the wings is to create a thin fan fold from the rectangle shape and insert it into the bug body to create a 3D butterfly.

One of the goals in having a Family Art Day is to allow families the opportunity to create together.

We all have the desire to create something, and in our post-modern society there seem to be few opportunities to come together and create together.

We have many examples around us of the effects of the break-up of the family and community.

It’s time to come together and make a creative, transformitive change in our community.

When various ages work together, unity creates community.

Seeing generations create together passes on traditions and knowledge and understanding of where one lives.

We are not meant to create alone.

We were meant to work as a community, passing on our knowledge as well as learning from others, no matter what their age.

The community is the web of life that inextricably embraces, defines, and empowers children and adults alike. -Peter London

I hope you can join us for future classes, events, gallery exhibitions and creative opportunities to creatively transform our community.