3D art

Exploring clay


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The Wednesday afternoon art class recently explored the medium of oil-based clay.

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Students explored many different building techniques as they learned how to work with this type of clay.

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Students created clay coils and ropes and learned how to build with rope coils.

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Everyone enjoyed exploring and learning new building techniques with oil-based clay.

Create your own Basket Workshop


Linda Kirgis will teach you how to make a small, round reed basket.

The basket will be from 5-1/2” to 8-1/2” in diameter (your choice) & will be woven from flat reed and round reed.

You will have the opportunity to weave in the color of your choice.

 Cost $25 includes all supplies.

We have extended the deadline -Sign up by June 16, 2012

The tools are simple and will be provided for your use during the class.

Class Size 6-8 people participants Ages 10 and up

 Date: Saturday, June 30, 2012 

9 a.m.-1 p.m.

(or until all baskets are completed.) Please feel free to bring along snacks,drinks or a lunch for yourself.

To sign up for this workshop email: theartjunction@yahoo.com  or call 419-935-3404

Paper mache pottery -finishing touches


The pottery students recently painted their projects.

This was the last session, and there was much to be accomplished!

Finding a color, design or pattern to add to their creation was the priority for this last session.

That did not mean that fun was not a part of the session.

Focus and concentration on creating the desired look of the pottery required many creative skills.

This project required the ability to visualize the end result.

It also required some hard work.

The students put a lot time and attention in their final push to complete their paper mache pottery.

Then it required some much needed drying time.

But with all good things waiting is required…for drying.

The students have much to be proud of as they have a great memory and a wonderful piece of pottery that represents their vision and exploration into 3D building techniques.

Maybe you now will be inspired to create a piece of paper mache pottery or sign up for a future class at the Art Junction!

Paper flowers


The home-school art class learned how to create paper flowers.

It’s amazing what one can create with some colored tissue paper, flexi-sticks (pipe cleaners) and learning  a few new ways to fold paper.

It’s fun to learn a new skill and to explore all the variations you can come up with on a basic idea.

The kids had a lot of fun in producing their own flower creations.

Everyone joined together to create a large beautiful bouquet of handmade flowers!

Paper mache pottery -week 1


We began our new class creating paper mache pottery this past week.

Participants learned about basic paper folding methods as well as various methods of building pottery.

Materials are very simple to begin with: newspaper and masking tape.

Learning how to create a coil out of paper is very similar to creating a coil out of clay….only with a different medium.

The next step is to learn how to roll up the coil to create the base of the pot.

Just like regular pottery, paper mache pottery is a very hands-on project.

Coiling is a method of creating pottery.  This method has been used in a variety of ways. Using the coiling technique, it is possible to build thicker or taller walled vessels, which may not have been possible using earlier methods. The technique permits control of the walls as they are built up and allows building on top of the walls to make the vessel look bigger and bulge outward or narrow inward with less danger of collapsing.

Next week we will begin the process of building the pottery after creating many coils.

 

Opening night


Opening night at the Art Junction for the Willard High School Spring Exhibition.

We had a great turnout of various ages to view the students’ work.

This exhibition demonstrates the wide variety of work the students engage in daily in the visual arts course of studies.

Come view the paintings, drawings and clay work of Willard High School visual art students under the direction of Art Teacher John Buss. Support the emerging art talents of these young artists by attending their exhibition this spring as they visually express themselves and the greater community around them.

Regular Gallery Hours: Fridays & Saturdays April 14 – May 5, 2012 4:30 – 7:00 p.m.  *Special showings upon request!

Butterfly Day


The Art Junction held it’s second Family Art Day on March 31, 2012 with the theme of Butterflies.

Families had the opportunity to come together to create together.

Butterflies are a wonderful symbol of Spring and the transformation that is taking place in the environment around us during this season.

A butterfly is a mainly day-flying insect  which includes the butterflies and moths. Like other holometabolous insects, the butterfly’s life cycle consists of four parts: egg, larva, pupa and adult.

Butterflies have large, often brightly coloured wings, and conspicuous, fluttering flight. Butterflies comprise the true butterflies (superfamily Papilionoidea), the skippers (superfamily Hesperioidea) and the moth-butterflies (superfamily Hedyloidea).

Butterflies like the Monarch will migrate over long distances. Some butterflies have evolved symbiotic and parasitic relationships with social insects such as ants.

Some butterfly species are pests because in their larval stages they can damage domestic crops or trees; however, some species are agents of pollination of some plants, and caterpillars of a few butterflies (e.g., Harvesters) eat harmful insects.

Culturally, butterflies are a popular motif in the visual and literary arts.

When the butterfly larva is fully grown, hormones are produced. At this point the larva stops feeding and begins “wandering” in the quest of a suitable pupation site, often the underside of a leaf.

The larva transforms into a pupa (or chrysalis) by anchoring itself to a substrate and moulting for the last time. The chrysalis is usually incapable of movement, although some species can rapidly move the abdominal segments or produce sounds to scare potential predators.

The pupal transformation into a butterfly through metamorphosis has held great appeal to mankind. To transform from the miniature wings visible on the outside of the pupa into large structures usable for flight, the pupal wings undergo rapid mitosis and absorb a great deal of nutrients. Let’s see how the creative process is similar to the metamorphosis a butterfly endures.

Participants first painted coffee filter paper which, after drying, transforms into the butterfly wings.

While awaiting the drying process, families had the opportunity to create another type of butterfly.

Employing a technique called a “blotto panting”, families  could create another butterfly.

Blotto painting is a painting made by applying tempera paint onto one side of a sheet of paper, then folding the paper and pressing the two sides together.


Like an inkblot, a blotto painting is apt to be symmetrical and nonobjective. Making one is largely an aleatoric act — leaving much to chance.

Although the concept of symmetry is used in creating half of the butterfly design, much is left up to creative chance or a happy accident.

This project reflects much of the mystery of the creative process…we never quite know what the final results of a creative experience will foster.

This makes a blotto painting a transformative project, much like the pupa becoming a butterfly.

The next step in returning to the 3D butterfly project is to select a plastic bug body and a flexi stem for the antennae and to then put them together.

The final step in transforming the wings is to cut the coffee filter in half and the half shape into a rectangle.

The very last step in creating the wings is to create a thin fan fold from the rectangle shape and insert it into the bug body to create a 3D butterfly.

One of the goals in having a Family Art Day is to allow families the opportunity to create together.

We all have the desire to create something, and in our post-modern society there seem to be few opportunities to come together and create together.

We have many examples around us of the effects of the break-up of the family and community.

It’s time to come together and make a creative, transformitive change in our community.

When various ages work together, unity creates community.

Seeing generations create together passes on traditions and knowledge and understanding of where one lives.

We are not meant to create alone.

We were meant to work as a community, passing on our knowledge as well as learning from others, no matter what their age.

The community is the web of life that inextricably embraces, defines, and empowers children and adults alike. -Peter London

I hope you can join us for future classes, events, gallery exhibitions and creative opportunities to creatively transform our community.